Monday, March 3, 2014

Droopy Daffodils and Floppy Freesia

Why is it the daffodils can't hold their heads up?  Are they shy?  Don't they know how pretty they are?  I've been trying to get a good picture of mine but, short of holding their heads up to face the camera, I've done a poor job of it.


I've no ID on this variety even though I have a lot of them




I think this one is Narcissus 'White Lion'



I'm also having trouble with my Freesia, which have a tendency to flop and lay about with their heads on the ground.  I need to get more flower stakes.






The Anemones, in contrast, stand tall and proud.





The Ranunculus I planted from tubers in the fall have begun to bloom too, at least the purple variety.  I love the flower but I'm not sure how I feel about the color of this one, which reads as more red than purple to me.




The biggest surprise in the bulb category was the appearance of the Hippeastrum cybister I planted along the street last year after their initial bloom as potted plants.  Despite being planted in a relatively dry and inhospitable location and repeatedly being dug up by raccoons, it appears that at least 3 of the 6 are going to bloom.  One already has.

I have an ID on this one - it's Hippeastrum cybister 'Emerald'



The succulent bulbs, Ledebouria socialis, are also blooming.  They aren't easy to photograph either.  I love that speckled foliage.




There's more bulb foliage coming up but, frankly, I've forgotten most of what I planted.  I know there are some Spanish bluebells scattered here and there for starters.  Although I keep pretty good records of my perennials and shrubs, I'm terrible about recording which bulbs I've planted, much less where I've planted them.  When they show up, it's always a delightful surprise.


12 comments:

  1. At least Daffodils aren't as shy and droopy headed as Hellebores! What a delightful bunch of flowering bulbs you have there Kris, so beautiful to see with their vivid and rich colours. The colours of the freesia and anemones are gorgeous! Freesias don't do well in our garden so it may be floppy at yours but at least they are flowering :))

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    1. Hellebores don't want to grow for me, although I do have one bud, which looks as though it's going to bloom (at last!). Re the freesias, I should probably just treat them as cut flowers and bring them inside to enjoy the wonderful scent.

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  2. I have never come across that lovely Hippeastrum. It doesn't seem to have the ungainly long neck of the Hippeastrums we grow as houseplants. You have so much beautiful colour in your garden. I wouldn't mind floppy flowers if I could have lovely Freesias in bloom in the garden.

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    1. As I recall, Chloris, that Hippeastrum's stem was significantly longer when I grew it in a pot so maybe the shorter stem is the result of growing it in garden soil.

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  3. I could almost smell those beautifier freesias, just vibrant colors all of them!

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    1. The scent of even a small number of cut freesia is incredible - as I mentioned above to Mark & Gaz, I should probably just treat them as a cut flower (or buy a whole lot of flower supports).

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  4. The unnamed Daffodil was beautiful!
    Glad to see the flowers that we buy as cut flowers to grow in your garden.
    I bought the anemone tubers which I will plant in pots.
    Dear greetings
    Mariana

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    1. I think that daffodil is sweet too, Mariana - I just wish I'd remembered to record her name somewhere.

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  5. I have a daffodil very similar to your White Lion. It is the floppiest flower I have ever had! But other daffodils stand taller, at least when they are not beaten down by pouring rain and cold temperatures. I wonder if the variety has something to do with it?

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    1. Yes, the double daffodils like 'White Lion' do have heavy heads so I cut them some slack but I can't explain the droopiness of the small, single cupped variety - I'm concerned that maybe something is awry with the cultural conditions.

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  6. Daffodils like to be coy. They're flirting with you and pretending to be shy. Those layabout freesias! If they weren't so gorgeous and didn't smell like heaven, I'm sure you'd have kicked their lazy bottoms to the curb years ago!

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    1. So true about the freesias, Peter! Their annoying floppiness is what stopped me from putting in more this past fall but, when I see them, I always wish there were more.

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